Publié dans EuroIntervention. 2018 Sep;14(7):789-797

Auteurs : Collet JP, Kerneis M, Lattuca B, Yan Y, Cayla G, Silvain J, Lapostolle F, Ecollan P, Diallo A, Vicaut E, Hamm CW, Van ‘t Hof AW, Montalescot G; ATLANTIC Investigators.

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Abstract

EuroIntervention

Background and aim :

The aim of the study was to examine the main results of the ATLANTIC trial in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), randomised to pre- versus in-hospital ticagrelor, according to age.

Methods :

Patients were evaluated by age class (<75 vs. ≥75 years) for demographics, prior cardiovascular history, risk factors, management, and outcomes.

Results :

Elderly patients (≥75 years; 304/1,862) were more likely to be women, diabetic, lean, with a prior history of myocardial infarction and CABG, and with comorbidities (p<0.01 for all). Elderly patients presented more frequently with acute heart failure and less frequently had thromboaspiration, a stent implanted (p<0.01) and an aggressive antithrombotic regimen. Elderly patients had lower rates of pre- and post-PCI ≥70% ST-segment elevation resolution (43.9% vs. 51.6%; p=0.035), of pre- and post-PCI TIMI 3 flow (17.1% vs. 27.5%, p=0.0002), and a higher rate of the composite of death/MI/stroke/urgent revascularisation (9.9% vs. 2.9%; OR 3.67, 95% CI [2.27; 5.93], p<0.0001) and mortality (8.5% vs. 1.5%; OR 6.45, 95% CI [2.75; 15.11], p<0.0001). There was a non-significant trend towards more frequent major bleedings among elderly patients (TIMI major 2.3% vs. 1.1%; OR 2.13, 95% CI [0.88; 5.18], p=0.095). There was no significant interaction between time of ticagrelor administration (pre-hospital versus in-lab) and class of age for all outcomes.

Conclusion :

Elderly patients, who represented one sixth of the patients randomised in the ATLANTIC trial, had less successful mechanical reperfusion and a sixfold increase in mortality at 30 days, probably due to comorbidities and possible undertreatment. The effect of early ticagrelor was consistent irrespective of age.